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The Painting Center, NY, NY
11/9/2019

The Painting Center, NY, NY
Happy to have my work curated into The Painting Center's online Art File Gallery - see it here.

 

Exhibition @ the Museum of Art, University of New Hampshire
10/25/2019

Exhibition @ the Museum of Art, University of New Hampshire
I'm excited to show with my fabulous artist book group in The Odyssey Project: An Old Story for Modern Times, opening 10/30, 4:40-6:30 pm, at The Museum of Art at the University of New Hampshire, Durham, Oct. 24- Dec. 14, 2019. Image: Goddesses, Monsters & Mortals series, each 14”x11”. 
 
“Fifteen women artists, all members of a long-running book group, created artwork in response to Emily Wilson’s remarkable new translation of The Odyssey, the first English translation by a woman. The artists explore in different styles and media the characters and topics covered in Homer’s ancient poem: the meaning of home; the near impossibility of returning home; loyalty; families; migrants; war; poverty; identity; transformation. Participating artists include: Nancy Berlin, Ruth Fields, Carol Greenwood, Jane Kamine, Colleen Kiely, Marilyn Levin, Jennifer Moses, Karen Moss, Sterling Mulbry, Carla Munsat, Ellen Rich, Judy Riola, Civia Rosenberg, Sandra Stark and Brenda Star."

Boston Globe Critic's Pick
9/2/2019

Boston Globe Critic's Pick
The Ticket: What’s happening in the local arts world
Happy to see "Women on the Verge", my upcoming 9/6 show at The Cost Annex, chosen as a Critic's Pick in "The Ticket" in the Boston Globe, 09/01/2019 !





 

Solo Exhibition at The Cost Annex
8/30/2019

Solo Exhibition at The Cost Annex
Paula, Oil & acrylic on wood panel, 48" x 36", 2019 (photo credit: Will Howcroft)

The Cost Annex is pleased to present, for one night only, Women on the Vergea solo exhibition by Colleen Kiely curated by Robert Moeller.
 
Friday, Sept. 6th, 6-9 pm, 59 Wareham St., 5th fl., Boston
 
The title of the series references Pedro Almodovar’s 1988 film that explores female identity via the striking use of both color and pattern. These paintings are process-driven and rooted in art-historical sources from the past and present. The work began with sketchbook studies of sources, including painters’ models (Manet), and self-portraits by female artists (Modersohn-Becker). The portraits then morphed through a series of transformations, merging formal concerns with imagination and invention, in a dance between resolution and dissolution, until each image embodies a specific identity. Dressed neatly, their faces awry, the figures in the paintings look directly at us or gaze at someone or something just outside the frame. These women go about their daily lives, navigating boundaries between public and private, meeting the viewer in an open-ended encounter.